Goodreads

Saturday, June 25, 2016

The Tenth Plague

Title:  The Tenth Plague
Author:  Adam Blumer
Pages:  448
Year:  2016
Publisher:  Kirkdale Press
My rating is 5 stars.
After completing adoption papers and legal matters, Marc and Gillian decide to take up a friend’s invitation to a free weekend at a resort.  However, as Marc and Gillian pull into the resort parking lot it looks like a circus with cameras, TV news and a man using a bullhorn to speak to the crowd.  A group of translators are also at the lodge working on a new translation of the Bible that might be the cause of chaos, but why would that cause such uproar?
Along with that action, a person or persons seems bent on tormenting the resort guests with recreating the ten plagues of Egypt from the Old Testament.  At least that is what is thought until a couple of people show up dead and the mystery thickens!
The author uses fictional places and events, weaving into the story some of America’s history.  Plus Marc is a pastor who longs to reunite with his father, but is shut out for reasons you will discover as you read the story.  I thought the suspense would not let up and it didn’t!  It seemed as though the writer kept increasing the climax and tension while occasionally adding a twist of the plot to keep me glued to the book for hours!
This is a great thriller that readers can sink their teeth into and not be disappointed!  The ending was packed with a very meaningful and truthful message about God, forgiveness and new beginnings.  I hope you will take time to read the book and perhaps share it with family, friends and even get your local library to get a copy so many more can enjoy this rich tale!

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog.  Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255. “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Friday, June 24, 2016

Faith (Quaker Brides #3)

Title:  Faith (Quaker Brides #3)
Author:  Lyn Cote
Pages:  384
Year:  2016
Publisher:  Tyndale
My rating is 5 stars.
Faith Cathwell has one main goal when she volunteers to be a nurse during the Civil War and that goal is to find her best friend Shiloh.  Shiloh is a free woman of color who was kidnapped five years before the war broke out and taken back to the South and sold as a slave.  Faith, along with Shiloh’s sister Honoree, searched when and where they were able to do so, but were limited by fear for their lives as Faith is an abolitionist Quaker and Honoree is a free woman of color.  Neither woman is safe alone in the South.  They see their chance to get geographically closer to the South by volunteering their services to the Union as nurses, so they find themselves serving in an army hospital very close to the battles.  They face disrespect and derision from many soldiers and doctors, but not all of them.  Faith meets Colonel Devlin Knight when he comes to her asking her to tend his wounded cousin.  He initially neglects to mention that his cousin is a Confederate soldier.
In return for her help, Devlin agrees to help her search for Shiloh.  As they spend time together on occasion, both begin to quickly fall in love.  However, Devlin keeps a slave and just knows he is going to die in this war.  Faith cannot tolerate slavery and doesn’t understand how Devlin can fight for the North, but still own a slave.  Despite their attraction to each other, they don’t see how there is a future for them.  Faith’s deep religious holdings are foreign to Devlin as he has distanced himself from God.  This is another obstacle for them to overcome.  As the war rages on the battlefield, so does the struggle within each of their hearts.
I have thoroughly enjoyed each story in the Quaker Brides Series and encourage readers to get all three books.  Each book can be a standalone story, but there are references to the prior stories.  If you are like me and like to do things in order, then start with book one so you can get the background and history from the get go.  I liked the setting and found reading about the Quakers very interesting.  The romance in each story was clean, and I found the fortitude of these Quaker women amidst persecution and the struggles of life two hundred years ago or more was inspiring.  The author has done her research, which made the story come alive for me as well as teach me something about this time period.  I can’t wait to see what Lyn writes next!

Disclosure of Material Connection:  The above is my opinion only.  I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Rediscovering God in America (3rd Edition)

Title:  Rediscovering God in America (3rd Edition)
Author:  Newt & Callista Gingrich
Pages:  192
Year:  2016
Publisher:  Center Street
My rating is 5 stars.
Most of Americans are aware of the battles of expressions of faith and other threats to our Constitutional freedoms.  Perhaps for too long we have depended on schools, churches and other institutions to continue teaching as well as promoting citizenship.  Times have certainly changed since I grew up when I recited the Pledge of Allegiance or sing our National Anthem before my school day began.  Today, most kids don’t.
I believe we as Americans need to take into our hands the task to pass down to the next generation the history of America, both the good and the bad of her history.  Here is a book that provides such an aid to teach, talk and remind ourselves and coming generations what the foundations of America are regardless of what learning institutions, church or other social groups we are part of.  In fact, this is a book that historians would love and even young children can view the pictures and begin to grow the heart of a strong citizen.
Many have paid the ultimate sacrifice along with many still serving to protect our country from all enemies, both foreign and domestic.  If we don’t share our nation’s true history, there is a gap in the heart and minds of Americans that goes unfilled that perhaps makes them unaware of whom, as a nation, we really are and what is at stake if we remain silent.
So I heartily ask that readers obtain a copy for their own personal library and consider giving a copy to friends or other family members as a gift.  We can ill afford to not look at what our foundation for this country is and help in whatever way we can to build up that foundation for future generations!  People will find it is a quick read, full of information and one that helps us to remember those who have gone before us and left us a rich legacy and nation!

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog.  Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255. “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Messenger by Moonlight

Title:  Messenger by Moonlight
Author:  Stephanie Grace Whitson
Pages:  352
Year:  2016
Publisher:  Faith Words
My rating is 4 stars.
This is a nice, gentle tale of a young woman who works for The Pony Express.  She is not a rider, but a cook at one of the stations that the riders rode into as well as stagecoaches stopping in.  Annie’s job is to feed the riders, passengers and stagecoach drivers.  She didn’t want to come west, but her two brothers volunteered her for the job of cook without her knowledge.  Her brothers are going to be riders for The Pony Express to earn money to help make her dream of a home come to fruition, so her options were to go with them or be left behind, alone in a new town of St. Jo, Missouri.  She and her brothers had been evicted from the family farm after their father’s death.  Unbeknownst to them, he had big gambling debts and the only way to satisfy them was to sell the farm.  They decided to try to big city of St. Jo for a brighter future.  When they hit town, they quickly learn of a good paying job with a startup company and gain employment for all three siblings.
Upon arriving at the station, Annie has a rough start as the station owner, George Mason, doesn’t seem to like her.  She burns food, uses too much food and doesn’t know where any supplies are kept.  Her brothers seem to thrive at their jobs, but Annie is miserable.  She doesn’t give up and over time she gains the interest of a soldier at a nearby fort.  She also learns her way around the kitchen and shows George she is a good cook.  Annie and George slowly form a friendship.  When a crisis hits, Annie always turns to the little Scripture she was taught by her mother and then to some Scripture passages one of her brother has highlighted for her.
I really enjoyed the Author’s Note after the conclusion of the story.  I found it interesting what her research did and did not turn up about The Pony Express and the role of women in the west.  They had such a difficult life with daily struggles just to survive.  I liked Annie’s brother Emmet, who always pointed Annie to Scripture or reminded her of God’s character when she needed it most.  He was such an encourager and steady, positive influence on her.  This was my first book from this author, and I look forward to reading more of her works.  Won’t you join me?

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog.  Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255. “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”