Wednesday, August 15, 2012

This Scarlet Cord

Title:  This Scarlet Cord
Author:  Joan Wolf
Pages:  299
Year:  2012
Publisher:  Thomas Nelson
Note:  I received a complimentary copy for an honest review of this book.  The opinions shared in this review are solely my responsibility.  Other reviews can be read at http://seekingwithallyurheart.blogspot.com/ .  Also follow me on Twitter @lcjohnson1988
                Joan Wolf puts forth a different view on the story of Rahab from the Old Testament.  The facts in her fictional account are the same as the Bible in that Rahab is a Canaanite woman living in the city of Jericho.  The Israelites come to take back from the Canaanites the land God had promised them, so they march around the city’s protective wall one time a day for six days.  On the seventh day, they march around the wall and the walls fall down, leaving the city defenseless.  Israel attacks and completely destroys the city by burning it to the ground.  Because Rahab had previously hidden two Israelite spies from the king’s soldiers and made a bargain for their protection when the attack came, Rahab saves herself and her family from certain death.  Rahab is also a prostitute to name just some of the facts.
                The author shows one way Rahab could have gotten the title of prostitute, and it is not the way you would think.  Readers learn about Rahab as a young girl, her relationship with her family, how she girl.  She literally runs into Sala, a young, Hebrew man, and the story really takes off from there.
                Sala is the only son in his family, and is expected to follow in the footsteps of his father by taking over the family business.  His father also is responsible for reading God’s word to the other Hebrews in his hometown.  This is another of the responsibilities Sala is being trained to eventually take over.  He is with his father on business when he first meets Rahab.
                Rahab and Sala are parted for a couple of years, but run into each other again.  A relationship develops beyond friendship, but Sala knows his father will never let him marry Rahab.  She is a Canaanite and unclean, believing in Baal and a host of many other gods.  Sala and his family believe in the One True God.  He is only supposed to marry another Hebrew.  Rahab has her own harrowing meeting with the king of Jericho.  She comes to realize her gods are failing her.  Can anyone rescue her?  Can she trust this One True God?  Will the Israelite spies keep their promise?  Will she and Sala ever be able to marry?
                This is a story with Rahab in a way that I never had thought about before.  Rahab in this story is quite young when she is declared a prostitute.  She is shown to be very practical, resourceful and intelligent.  The love story between she and Sala develops quickly, and the pages turn faster as the plot gains speed for more action.  This is a story that may make you rethink some assumptions you had previously made.  This book is certainly worth the time invested to read it.
My rating is 3.5 stars.

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