Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Path of Freedom



Title:  Path of Freedom
Author:  Jennifer Hudson Taylor
Pages:  240
Year:  2013
Publisher:  Abingdon Press
                There are many historical events that capture the imagination of authors, screenwriters, all types of people.  Little known facts about someone, some event or era in history can stir the imagination of people.  The Civil War was a period of time that like a prism can be looked at from various angles.  Jennifer Hudson Taylor does so in this work of fiction centered on the Underground Railroad.
In this work of fiction, a Quaker family becomes involved in helping those seeking freedom to realize their dreams.  While not all within the community know who helps or doesn’t, there is a love story and learning to grow in faith in the story.  When Bruce was a youngster, he teased Flora ruthlessly. Now, while on a mission to bring a couple to safety, their new feelings for each other begin to come to light.
Facing all sorts of dangers and challenges causes their past with each other to come out and that sometimes causes them to ask for forgiveness or pray for it.  Other times bring the lack of trust and rushed decisions to a head, placing lives at risk.  Bruce has run these missions many times before, but on this trip Flora has been asked to help because she is a midwife.  Irene, Flora’s sister, goes along so that no one will cast suspicion on Flora’s reputation if only Flora and Bruce went since they aren’t married.
Flora’s parents had been on several missions when they were younger, though few ever knew the truth of their whereabouts.  Jim and Marta want to have their baby born not into a life of slavery, but one of freedom.  Does this become a reality for them?  Flora has been in correspondence with a doctor for two years, even considering a courtship with him when she arrives at her aunt’s home.  Who does Flora choose and why?
One particular aspect of this work of fiction I enjoyed was the tension between a couple of the characters throughout the novel.  I also enjoyed watching the author have the Quaker young people develop a friendship with the runaway slaves.  At the beginning of the novel, the author shares what she found out about the wagon with the false bottom, the Quakers’ role, if any, during the Civil War and how quilts come into play as part of the story.
My rating is 4 stars.
Note:  I received a complimentary copy for an honest review of this book.  The opinions shared in this review are solely my responsibility.  Other reviews can be read at http://seekingwithallyurheart.blogspot.com/.  Also follow me on Twitter @lcjohnson1988, FaceBook at https://www.facebook.com/lisa.johnson.75457
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